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Background.: Living kidney donor selection has become more liberal with acceptation of hypertensive donors. Here, we evaluate short-term and 1-and 5-year renal outcome of living kidney donors with preexistent hypertension. Methods.: We compared outcome of hypertensive donors by gender, age, and body mass index with matched control donors. Hypertension was defined as predonation antihypertensive drug use. All donors had glomerular filtration rate ( 125 I-iothalamate) and effective renal plasma flow ( 131 I-hippuran) measured 4 months before and 2 months after donation. A subset of donors had serum creatinine measured 1 year after donation or a renal function measurement 5 years after donation. Results.: Included were 47 hypertensive donors and 94 control donors (both 53% male; mean age, 57±7 years; and body mass index, 28±4 kg/m 2 ). Pre-and early postdonation, systolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were significantly higher in hypertensive donors. Control donors showed a rise in diastolic blood pressure after donation, and thus the predonation difference was lost postdonation. Both at 1 year (29 hypertensive donors, 58 controls) and 5 years after donation (13 hypertensive donors and 26 controls) blood pressure was similar. Renal function was similar at all time points. Discussion.: In summary, hypertensive living kidney donors have similar outcome in terms of blood pressure and renal function as control donors, early and 1 and 5 years after donation. © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Original publication

DOI

10.1097/TP.0b013e318240e9b9

Type

Journal article

Journal

Transplantation

Publication Date

27/02/2012

Volume

93

Pages

412 - 417